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ODPHP

Organization:
Office of Disease Prevention & Health Promotion
Website:

City:
Rockville
State:
MD
Country:
United States

About Me:

Silje Lier, ODPHP BloggerSilje is a Multimedia Advisor on the Communication and eHealth team at the HHS Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Silje supports communication activities related to ODPHP Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, Healthy People 2020, Dietary Guidelines 2010, and health literacy initiatives. Silje is interested in mobile health applications, new media and innovative ways to promote healthy behaviors. She has some experience blogging about brands and media design, and is active on Twitter at @sealya.

Katrina Butner, News & Reports ODPHP BloggerKatrina Butner, PhD, RD, ACSM CES is a Prevention Science Fellow for the HHS Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP). She is a Registered Dietitian and an Exercise Physiologist, certified through the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). She is involved with communicating the messages from the Physical Activity Guidelines and the Dietary Guidelines. She is currently leading the efforts from ODPHP on the Physical Activity Guidelines Midcourse Review. Katrina enjoys running half marathons, cycling and taking a variety of fitness classes at her gym.

Subscribe via email to Ms. Lier’s and Ms. Butner’s ODPHP blog posts.

Recent Posts by ODPHP


60 Minutes or More a Day, Where Kids Live, Learn, and Play

by ODPHP March 12, 2013

Cross-posted from the President's Council of Fitness, Sports and Nutrition blog.

By: Karin Allor Pfeiffer, PhD, FACSM, Associate Professor in the Department of Kinesiology and faculty in the Center for Physical Activity and Health at Michigan State University, Member of the PCFSN Science Board, and Subcommittee Member of the Physical Activity Guidelines Midcourse Report

In 2008, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released the first-ever Physical Activity Guidelines (PAG), which describes the amount and types of physical activity Americans need for overall health and well-being.

To mark the fifth anniversary of the PAG, the President's Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition (PCFSN) convened a subcommittee of experts to conduct a midterm review of effective interventions that promote physical activity opportunities for youth ages 3-17.

After reviewing the relevant science, the subcommittee developed a report - Physical Activity Guidelines Midcourse Report: Strategies to Increase Physical Activity Among Youth - that focused on five key settings that provide opportunities for youth to be active for 60 minutes or more a day where they live, learn, and play.

School: Make quality physical activity a part of the school day in a variety of ways. Overall, findings supported school-based interventions as having the most evidence to increase physical activity among youth. With the average school day lasting 6-7 hours, it is not surprising that enhanced PE classes, classroom activity breaks, recess, and before and after school activities have played a large role in advancing childhood health. Active transporation, which includes walking or biking to and from school, also provides a great opportunity for kids to get their daily physical activity.

Preschool and Childcare: Start healthy habits for life with active play in preschool. Preschool and childcare centers showed excellent results in starting healthy habits for youth. Increasing time children spend outside and providing portable play equipment on playgrounds were especially effective. The findings also demonstrated that training staff in the delivery of structured physical activity sessions is a productive way to get youth active at an early age.

Community: Build the physical environments of cities, towns and neighborhoods to encourage physical activity. Community settings were found to be promising in impacting physical activity at the population level. Changes to the built environment, such as altering the mix of residential and retail space to be more walker-friendly can encourage more physical activity and shape the sociocultural environment of a community.

Family and Home: Be physically active with your kids and help them develop active lifestyles at a young age. Research shows that children develop physical activity behaviors, attitudes and values in the home, but there is not yet enough evidence to make firm recommendations in this area.

Primary Care: Physical activity is critical for overall health. Talk to your patients about the importance of being active every day. Health care providers remain critical to monitoring children's health, but more research should be conducted to determine specific recommendations on enhancing physical activity.

Parents and caregivers, childcare providers, teachers, healthcare professionaks and policymakers have an opportunity to work together to ensure that children are able to achieve 60 minutes or more of physical activity each day. By providing support at home, integrating physical activity into the school day and building smarter communities, we can enable youth to adopt healthier, more active lifestyles.

To download the Physical Activity Guidelines Midcourse Report: Strategies to Increase Physical Activity Among Youth and infographic, visit www.health.gov/paguidelines.

COMING SOON! Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Midcourse Report

by ODPHP March 6, 2013

We know childhood and adolescence is a period when regular physical activity is critical for healthy growth and development, but today America's youth are less active than ever before.

This Friday, the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) and the President's Council on Fitness, Sports, & Nutrition (PCFSN) will release the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Midcourse Report: Strategies to Increase Physical Activity Among Youth at the Partnership for a Healthier America Summit in Washington, D.C.

Friday, March 8, 2013 9:45 - 11:00 AM EST

Burnham Room | Grand Hyatt Hotel | Washington, DC

The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (PAG) Midcourse Report comes five years after the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) published the first-ever PAG in 2008, describing the types and amounts of physical activity Americans ages 6 years and older need for overall health.

The PAG Midcourse Report builds on the Guidelines by highlighting intervention strategies for increasing physical activity in youth ages 3 to 17 years, identified in the current literature using a review-of-reviews approach.

The report provides implementation and research recommendations for leaders within five key settings that provide opportunities for youth to be active for 60 minutes or more each day:

  • School
  • Preschool and childcare
  • Community
  • Family and home
  • Primary health care

Download the PAG Midcourse Report and other materials at www.health.gov/PAGuidelines/Midcourse.

What are you doing in your home, school, organization or community to help kids be more active? We invite you to share your experiences and ideas.

Let's Move! Milestones & Collaborations: 2012 in Review

by ODPHP February 13, 2013

Originally posted on the Let's Move! blog, in honor of the 3rd year anniversary of the Let's Move! campaign

Since early 2010, First Lady Michelle Obama's Let's Move! initiative has been an important driver of childhood obesity prevention efforts across the nation. Through Let's Move!, leaders in business, health care, community, and government have joined educators, childcare providers, faith leaders, chefs and many others to have a meaningful, positive impact on the health of our nation's youth. This month, Let's Move! highlighted their accomplishments from the past three years on their blog.

Here's a snapshot of some Let's Move! milestones and collaborations from the past 12 months:

  • Disney announced that it will require all food and beverage products advertised, sponsored, or promoted on various Disney-owned media channels and online destinations and theme parks to meet nutritional guidelines that align with federal standards to promote fruit and vegetables and limit calories, sugar, sodium, and saturated fat by 2015.
  • In support of Team USA at the 2012 Olympic Games, the US Olympic Committee and several of its national governing bodies provided beginner athletic programming for free or low cost to more than 1.7 million kids in 2012.
  • The Department of Defense (DOD) announced dramatic improvements to nutrition standards for the $4.65 billion worth of food purchased every year for our troops and their families. For the first time in 20 years, DOD is updating their nutritional standards to include more fresh fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, and low-fat dairy products with every meal.
  • The First Lady celebrated a series of new collaborations to supports Let's Move! Cities, Towns and Counties. Organizations such as the National League of Cities and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation committed new resources to help hundreds of local elected officials advance the goals of Let's Move! in their communities. More than 150 local elected officials have committed to the goals of the initiative.
  • Throught the PHA "Play Streets," the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association funded street-closings to increase safe places for families to play. These areas are called "Play Streets" - city streets where kids and families can run, walk, bike, or play outside freely without traffic. In 2013, at least four Play Streets per city/town in 10 cities and towns across the country will be funded.
  • In August 2012, the First Lady hosted the first-ever Kids' State Dinner celebrating healthy lunchtime recipes created by kids. The First Lady, along with Epicurious, USDA, and the Department of Education, welcomed 54 young chefs from all 50 states and U.S. territories to a luncheon at the White House serving some of those healthy creations.
  • The President's Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition updated the President's Challenge Youth Fitness Test to reflect the latest science on kids' health and promote active, healthy lifestyles rather than athletic performance and competition. The new Presidential Youth Fitness Program is a voluntary, school-based program that assesses students' fitness-based health and helps them progress over time. The new program will be implemented in 25 percent of US schools by the end of 2013, and 90 percent of US schools by 2018.
  • The Partnership for a Healthier America teamed up with 157 hospitals to deliver more healthy options throughout their facilities. These hospitals have committed to work over the next three years to improve the nutrition of patient meals as well as that of the food options in on-site cafeterias. This includes more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-calorie options, and healthy beverages.

To learn more about Let's Move!, visit www.letsmove.gov.

Physical Activity Guidelines Midcourse Report

As we look forward to another year of robust partnerships and efforts to improve the health of America's children, the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, in partnership with the President's Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition, is happy to announce the upcoming release of the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Midcourse Report: Strategies to Increase Physical Activity Among Youth. This report, to be released on March 8, 2013 at the Partnership for a Healthier America Summit, highlights evidence-based intervention strategies for increasing physical activity throughout various sectors of society.

Learn more by visiting http://www.health.gov/paguidelines.

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