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ACSM 's Profile


Organization:
American College of Sports Medicine
City:
Indianapolis
State:
Indiana
Country:
United States

About Me:

ACSM Blogger Janet Walberg Rankin, Ph.D., FACSM, is President of the American College of Sports Medicine. She is a Professor in the Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise at Virginia Tech and Associate Dean of the Graduate School. She received her academic training at Duke University (B.S. in Zoology 1977) and University of California at Davis (Ph.D. in Nutrition 1982). She has taught courses in Exercise Physiology, Preventive and Therapeutic Value of Exercise, Sports Nutrition, and Exercise Metabolism.

Dr. Rankin’s research is related to sports nutrition or interventions for obesity. The overarching goal of current research in her laboratory is to clarify the optimal nutritional strategy to reduce inflammation and related health complications. Specific interventions evaluated include variations of dietary macronutrient mix, energy balance, specific foods, and dietary supplements.

The American College of Sports Medicine is the largest sports medicine and exercise science organization in the world. More than 45,000 international, national, and regional members and certified professionals are dedicated to advancing and integrating scientific research to provide educational and practical applications of exercise science and sports medicine.

ACSM BloggerRobert E. Sallis, M.D., FACSM – Exercise is Medicine Advisory Board Chairman Robert E. Sallis, M.D., FACSM, serves as the chairman for the Exercise is Medicine initiative and previously served as president (2007-08) of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). Dr. Sallis received his Bachelor of Science degree from the U.S. Air Force Academy and his medical degree from Texas A&M University. He completed his residency in family medicine at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Fontana, CA, where he served as chief resident. He has served as the head team physician at Pomona College since 1988, and holds a Certificate of Added Qualifications in sports medicine. Dr. Sallis lectures and publishes extensively in the area of sports medicine and serves as chairman of the Science Advisory Committee to Governor Schwarzenegger’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. He received the 2008 Community Leadership Award from the President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, and the 2009 Leonardo da Vinci award for international leadership in sports medicine from the Italian Federation of Sports Medicine. Dr. Sallis currently serves as editor-in-chief of ACSM’s clinical journal, Current Sports Medicine Reports.

Recent Posts by ACSM


How Let's Move! Has Impacted the Last Two Years

by ACSM February 27, 2013

It has been two years since First Lady Michelle Obama's Let's Move! initiative prompted families, individuals and organizations to take their health into their own hands. The campaign has given American families the motivation to live a healthier life through physical activity and nutrition, and continue the fight against childhood obesity.

Along with Let's Move!, the National Physical Activity Plan, Exercise is Medicine(R)(EIM), Childhood Obesity Awareness Month and countless other initiatives are strengthening the movement. Each of these initiatives brings something unique. Exercise is Medicine Month in May is the special recognition month for EIM and a time for everyone to idenfity, emphasize and celebrate the valuable health benefits of exercise on a national scale.

In 2012, American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) members were involved in the Let's Move Faith & Communities' Communities on the Move Video Challenge. The popular choice award went to a video called "100 Citizens: Role Models for the Future." 100 Citizens promotes the message that ending childhood obesity begins at home with the family.

USA Today's Family Fitness Challenge, which launched this month, paired six families with fitness experts to help them reach their health goals within four months. While sharing stories about their progress, they will also provide tips, tools and guidance everyone can use to start living a healthier life.

Along with these programs and initiatives, we continue to learn more every day from new research about exercise, nutrition, physiology and motivation. Our programs and policies are more effective than ever because of our growing base of information. From molecular-level, basic science to studies of group interaction and epidemiology, new knowledge is providing a solid base of evidence to underpin our efforts.

How do your efforts complement the work of Let's Move!, the National Physical Activity Plan and other initiatives?

Start the Year Off Right with a Commitment to Health

by ACSM January 16, 2013

A newfound - or renewed - commitment to health is a common sentiment each year after the holiday season of sweet treats, calorie-laden cocktails and scarce free time to stick to a fitness routine. Year after year, many people resolve to lose weight, get fit and be healthier, using the turn of a new year as motivation to turn over a new leaf. Many resolutions, made with the best of intentions, are broken almost before the New Year's Eve confetti is cleaned up, and few last until spring.

The keys to lifelong healthy habits include:

  • Setting realistic expectations, based on a knowledge of the facts and of your own goals, motivation and lifestyle
  • Building physical activity into your daily life and following healthy eating habits
  • Understanding that you will have lapses, plateaus and changes of circumstance that need not derail your overall progress
  • Knowing where to turn for factual information and personal support

Enjoyable alternatives offer healthy activity

The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommends at least 150 minutes (or 2 hours and 30 minutes) of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per week. If you're not currently physically active, this might be a great time to return to an activity you loved in the past or to get involved with a team sport. Not competitive? Don't like to run? A dance-based fitness class or yoga might be for you. Don't forget that consulting a certified trainer, exercise physiologist, or medical professional is always an important step before starting a new fitness program.

Cost need not be a concern

Financial constraints also weigh heavy on the minds of many as the new year begins. However, being healthy and fit doesn't require an expensive investment. Body weight training, or exercise that uses the body as resistance instead of equipment, was the most upwardly mobile activity on ACSM's 2013 fitness trends forecast. Body weight training can be done anywhere, including at home, and doesn't require a financial investment.

Beyond being buff - staying healthy throughout life

A desire to be fit isn't all about vanity. The most common diseases plaguing our world today are diseases caused by sedentary lifestyle - like hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, among others. Our daily lives are becoming increasingly scheduled around sitting: sitting at work, sitting in the car during long commutes, and sitting in the evening in front of the television. Committing to a healthy lifestyle not only can help you look good and feel good, but can keep the doctor away too.

For further reading on this topic, visit: "New Year, New Fitness Habits."

Look Past Clever Ads to Find Fun Family Physical Activity Opportunities

by ACSM December 12, 2012

Marketing: A Powerful Force

Families are inundated with powerful and noisy advertisements in the fields of health and fitness, many suggesting get-fit-quick products. Fitness and sports marketing may lead us to believe we can get six-pack abs through a new exercise device or that a certain pair of shoes will make us play like the pros... if only that were true!

As effective as these ads may be, they often leave the customer disappointed and frustrated with the results, or lack thereof. In addition to quick-fix disappointments, we constantly see ads for junk food via TV, radio, billboards, Internet, etc. Everywhere we look, there is temptation and the lure of a quick, family-pleasing meal.

How can families combat the marketing influencers and build a healthy lifestyle that will stick?

Fight Back for Physical Activity

The answer is simple: be active as a family, and talk about healthy lifestyles. Incorporating physical activity into busy family life doesn't have to be expensive, time-consuming or difficult. The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans state that children should be active for 60 minutes per day and adults should be active for 150 minutes per week. This can be as easy as walking or jogging, or as fun as shooting hoops or playing capture the flag. Parents can take part in family bonding activities while staying in shape, like taking a 20-30 minute to walk with their children after dinner or before school.

The American College of Sports Medicine's 2013 Health and Fitness Trends predict that 2013 will bring in many easy and economically friendly activities, such as body weight training. Make a goal to try at least four of the activities on the trend list - and see what works best for you and your family.

It's also important to talk together about the need to eat healthy meals and get regular physical activity. Children should learn to consider the sources of nutritional or exercise information they receive and to make judgments about what to believe and what advice to follow.

Marketers may be savvy by convincing us that we must have the latest product for a healthy life or fit physique. However, setting realistic goals, creating a schedule for fitness activities, and sharing solid information and goals can help families develop truly healthy habits that will last a lifetime.

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