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Workshop 4 Transcript

JADEN:
I’m ready to take off some extra pounds.

PREMA:
To look at what I’m eating and how much.

CARSON:
To get to a healthy weight and feel good while doing it.

JOSEPH:
To add more activity to my life. Spend a few minutes with us. Chances are you’ll pick up some good tips to help you with your journey to reaching a healthy weight.

JADEN:
And keeping it off. Our first tip? Set a weight goal with your doctor.

I’m done rationalizing that I’m just big-boned. Or I’m destined to be overweight, since being large runs in my family. Truth is, I need to get to a healthier weight. No more excuses.

My doctor helped me set a reasonable weight goal. She told me my BMI -- or body mass index -- is 29, which means I’m overweight.

To be at a healthy weight, I need to have a BMI under 25.

For me, that means I need to lose about 30 pounds.

Hey, that’s not so bad. I can do that. I’ve set mini-goals and rewards along the way. For every 5 pounds lost, I’m planning on buying a bottle of nail polish or treating myself to a movie.

Go to www dot health dot gov forward slash BMI to find out your BMI. Just type in your height and weight. It’s really simple.

Set a goal with your doctor and then take small steps. I’ve already started eating healthier. Today’s tips will get you on the road.

CARSON:
Like Jaden, I’m also on my way. In fact, I’ve lost 20 pounds already! I’m here to go over tip number 2: Eat less. Here are a few things you might want to try.

Limit high-calorie snacks. Instead of chips, I get my crunch from bell peppers with a bit of hummus. Hits the spot. And better for me!

And try to limit the sweets. Instead of cookies, satisfy your sweet tooth with a piece of fresh fruit. Or fruit mixed into plain yogurt.

Beverages can mean a lot of empty calories. Drink a small glass of juice instead of the big-sized one. Personally, I cut way back on soft drinks and I’m seeing a difference on the scale.

PREMA:
Wow, Carson. Great tips. I’m going to talk about tip 3: Track what you eat and drink. It gives you a good idea of what you are really eating, how much, and when.

Now, here are 3 ways to track: Keep a notebook nearby and write down everything you eat and drink. Or log in your food at www dot choosemyplate dot gov -- click on the “supertracker” button. Or take a photo with your cell phone to remind you of what you eat. After seeing a bunch of food photos one weekend, I said, “Enough of this mindless eating!” Tracking works. Give it a try.

JOSEPH:
Our final tip -- tip 4 is to get active. Physical activity burns calories. And that helps you lose weight and keep it off.

There’s a website I want you to visit: www dot health dot gov forward slash PA guidelines. This site gave me tips on how to get active and stay active.

It can help you find activities that you enjoy and plan them into your week. I try to do something for at least 10 minutes at a time to get the health benefits.

Which things would you like to try to add activity to your day?

Walk at lunch. Hike with the kids. Ride a bike. Take up a sport -- even just jogging in place while you watch TV.

It’s up to you.

JADEN:
Remember, adding activity to your life will burn calories.

PREMA:
And so now, there you have it.

CARSON:
4 great tips to help you reach a healthy weight.

JADEN:
Learn your BMI and set a healthy goal weight.

CARSON:
Pick the way you want to eat less. Pick healthier snacks. Skip dessert or just take a bite to satisfy. Cut back on high-calorie beverages.

PREMA:
Track what you eat.

JOSEPH:
Find an activity that you enjoy. Then do it!

JADEN:
Remember: small changes can make a big difference.

PREMA:
What will you do today to aim for a healthy weight?

VOICE-OVER ANNOUNCER:
For more information, go to www dot health dot gov forward slash dietary guidelines. This presentation was brought to you by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

 

This site is coordinated by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Office of the Secretary, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.