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Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015

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Anonymous Comment ID #737

09/18/2014

Affordability needs to be considered when designing the dietary guidelines. The American household can then apply the guidelines effectively. Having realistic goals that allows low income families achieve a healthy diet seems to be one of the critical points to take onto account. The guidelines are designed to help Americans eat healthy diets, promote health and prevent disease, therefore to ensure Americans with all kinds of incone are able to follow them, we must ensure that diets are not only based on scientific research but also affordability.

Also very important, We need to address the need to lower the consumption of processed foods that contains added fats, sugars, Preservatives and other chemicals. In order to address the increasing obesity epidemic, there needs to be a clear message that announces the adverse effects of these products.

Affiliation: Educational Institution: Higher Education Organization: Cuny Brooklyn College
Topic:
  • Food Environment
  • Food Groups (Fruits, Vegetables, Grains, Dairy, Protein Foods)

Anonymous Comment ID #736

09/18/2014

As an aspiring registered dietitian, I believe it is highly important to include the issue of sustainability in the Dietary Guidelines 2015. Also, the language should be clear and applicable to suggest a positive outcome rather than confuse the reader as to what the recommendations are. For example, more detail should go into stating the foods we are to decrease, like fat, and the difference between the different fats.

In addition, the Gluten-free diet should be mentioned in the DG2015 as an answer to individuals with Celiac Disease and Gluten intolerance, not just to those who choose it by preference.

In the chapter describing fruits to increase. It is not enough to say "increase in vegetables and fruits". Although it is understood that we can consume a wide variety and amount of vegetables and reap the benefits, assuming we are of good health, however, it Should mention that the amount of fruits to intake should be limited due to the high content of fructose in fruits and if our body doesn't really know the difference between added sugar and fructose, natural sugar, it is important to limit our sugar intake, even from fruit.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Fats (Total Fat, Solid Fats, Oils, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol)
  • Food Groups (Fruits, Vegetables, Grains, Dairy, Protein Foods)
  • Sustainability

Ahriyonna Phillips Comment ID #735

09/17/2014

When the guidlines for grains are being listed, It needs to be specified so that consumers will understand the difference between whole grains and refined grains. Why? because refined grains such as white bread and rice transfer into regular sugar. Refined grains add empty calories, cause metabolic effects, increase risk of heart disease and diabetes. Bad examples of grains to refrain from are french fries, specific breakfast cereals, potato and pasta salads, muffins, doughnuts ect.

Affiliation: Educational Institution: Higher Education Organization: Community College Of Philadelphia
Topic:
  • Food Groups (Fruits, Vegetables, Grains, Dairy, Protein Foods)

Anonymous Comment ID #734

09/17/2014

One recommendation that I have is to discuss the importance of eating "whole" foods and limiting the amount of processed food in the diet. Not only is processed food higher in sodium it contains chemicals, preservatives and coloring that have negative effects on our bodies. When you eat whole foods, you are getting more of the vitamins and nutrients than you would when eating processed foods.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Food Groups (Fruits, Vegetables, Grains, Dairy, Protein Foods)

Anonymous Comment ID #733

09/17/2014

Based on the discussion from Day 1, I have three comments/questions for your consideration.

1. Why are red meats continually lumped with processed meats?
This is an unfair, biased analysis of red meat protein as processed meats will clearly have negative health effects based on the preservation process. Red meat has various positive health outcomes when separated from its processed counterpart.

2. When analyzing calcium intake, how can the topic of acid/base balance and calcium resorption not be discussed?
With an acidic dietary pattern, calcium is typically leached from our bone structure and from muscular stores. The answer to the calcium conundrum is not to increase calcium intake, but rather to decrease calcium resorption through reducing our renal acid load. Specifically, this includes the reduction of processed foods, dairy, and grain content in the diet. Meats/Protein foods do have a net acid yield, but these proteins and amino acids are essential to bodily structure, cellular repair, production of enzymes-hormones, etc.

3. When analyzing dietary patterns relating to neural tube defects, etc., the conclusion made recommended a diet high in fruits, vegetables, grains, and low in red/processed meat (grouped together again) and sweets. Aside from the continual oversight of red meat vs. processed meat, was it taken into consideration that the flour supply in the US has been fortified with folic acid? Without this fortification, would grains be recommended to prevent birth defects? Shouldn't the Dietary Guidelines recommend a healthy diet without the need for fortified foods? Orange juice is a perfect example of a fortified food that should not be recommended. It contains just as much sugar as a soda, but is considered a healthy alternative because it is pumped full of calcium and other vitamins and minerals.

This system needs to take a serious step back and evaluate where they are taking these recommendations. All that is being done now is picking up the same shovel and digging the hole deeper, which only drives the health of this nation down.

Affiliation: Educational Institution: Secondary or School System Organization:
Topic:
  • Eating Patterns-Diets (USDA Food Patterns, DASH, Vegetarian, Low Carb, Hi-Protein, etc.)
  • Food Groups (Fruits, Vegetables, Grains, Dairy, Protein Foods)
  • Micronutrients (Sodium, Potassium, Vitamin D, Calcium, Iron)

Bernice Chu MSPH, RD Comment ID #732

09/17/2014

I am writing to you as a registered dietitian with a background in public health in response to request 5-2, food systems sustainability, specifically to provide recommendations for the inclusion of eating minimally processed whole foods as an important component of food system sustainability. Currently, we recommend that people eat whole foods for health reasons, but further framing it in terms of sustainability provides American families with additional motivation. In other words, if they are unwilling to eat minimally processed whole foods for the benefit of their own bodies and minds, perhaps they will do it if they know it affects future generations. [See attachment for more]

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Sustainability

William Murray Pres., CEO Comment ID #731

09/16/2014

Affiliation: Industry/Industry Association Organization: National Coffee Association
Topic:
  • Food Safety
  • Water & Beverages (Non-alcoholic)

Ali Chughtai Dr. Comment ID #730

09/16/2014

Moderate physical activity in hot sub-tropical weather entails that fruit intake be three servings per day.

Affiliation: Public Health Department Organization: Lahore Cantt. Board.
Topic:
  • Food Groups (Fruits, Vegetables, Grains, Dairy, Protein Foods)

Anonymous Comment ID #729

09/15/2014

I feel like restaurants should enforce management to do and give trainings to the seriousness of food safety. I was not aware of a lot until actually taught. I feel if workers are aware they will be less food poisoning cases.. I being someone who gets it a lot.

Affiliation: Educational Institution: Higher Education Organization: Community College of Philadelphia
Topic:
  • Food Safety

Anonymous Comment ID #728

09/15/2014

Three things I would like to see emphasized in the 2015 DGA.

1. Stronger guidance needed around reduced consumption of animal products.
2. Encourage more sustainable protein sources like beans/legumes. And when animal proteins are consumed, the animals are raised in humane environments.
3. Reduced food waste. Strategies to prevent food waste at home.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Sustainability
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