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Figure D7-1. Dose-Response Relationship Between Systolic Blood Pressure and Sodium Intake in Two Diets: Main Results From the DASH Sodium Trial (Sacks FM et al., 2001)

This figure shows the dose-response relationship between systolic blood pressure and sodium intake in two diets: the DASH and a control diet. The control diet represents the typical American Diet. The DASH diet emphasizes fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy foods; includes whole grains, poultry, fish, and nuts; and is lower in fats, red meat, sweets, and sugar-containing beverages. Each of these diets contains three sodium levels: higher (3,450 mg/d), intermediate (2,300 mg/d), and lower (1,150 mg/d). The three sodium levels are shown on the x axis. Systolic Blood Pressure in mmHg is shown on the y axis. The sample size of the control diet was 204. Systolic blood pressure decreased 2.1 mmHg and 4.6 mmHg when participants decreased their sodium intakes from the higher sodium group to the intermediate sodium level and from the intermediate sodium level to the lower sodium level in the control group, respectively. The sample size of the DASH diet group was 208. Systolic blood pressure decreased 1.3 mmHg and 1.7 mmHg when participants decreased their sodium intakes from the higher sodium group to the intermediate sodium level and from the intermediate sodium level to the lower sodium level in the DASH group, respectively. In each subgroup, the lowest blood pressure was observed in the DASH diet.

Control Diet represents the typical American diet. DASH diet emphasizes fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy foods, includes whole grains, poultry, fish, and nuts, and is reduced in fats, red meat, sweets, and sugar-containing beverages. The 3 sodium levels are defined as higher (3,450 mg/d), intermediate (2,300 mg/d) and lower (1,150 mg/d).

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Back to Part D. Science Base, Section 7. Fluid and Electrolytes