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Slides 61–91
 

Health Literacy

Slide Number Title and Content
61

Facilitate Healthy Decisionmaking

  • Use short documents that present “bottom-line” information, step-by-step instructions, and visual cues that highlight the most important information:
    • People process and use a limited amount of information when making a decision.
  • Align health information and recommendations with access to services, resources, and support!
62

Partner With Educators

Co-develop adult basic education lessons on health topics:

  • Adult learners want information that is relevant to their lives; health content is likely to engage them.
  • Construct lessons in which students use health-related texts, forms, and content from the Internet.
63

Partner With Educators

  • The K–12 education system is a critical point of intervention to improve health literacy.
  • Incorporate health-related tasks, materials, and examples into lesson plans.
  • Design and disseminate health information to support existing state standards.
  • Speak to students or help organize health-related field trips for local schools.
64

4. Advocate for Health Literacy Improvement

  • Make the case for improving health literacy.
  • Incorporate health literacy in mission and planning.
  • Establish accountability for health literacy activities.
65

Make the Case for Improving Health Literacy

  • Identify specific programs and projects affected by limited health literacy.
  • Target key opinion leaders with health literacy information:
    • Explain how health literacy improvement relates to your mission, goals, and strategic plan.
    • Circulate relevant research and reports on health literacy to colleagues.
    • Post and share health literacy resources.
66

Incorporate Health Literacy in Mission and Planning

  • Include goals and objectives specifically related to health literacy improvement in:
    • Strategic plans
    • Program plans
    • Educational initiatives
  • Goals can be broad (e.g., Achieving Healthy People 2010 Objective 11-2) or specific to the mission of the office/program.
67

Include Health Literacy in Grants, Contracts, and MOUs

Recommend that all products, materials, and forms be written in plain language and tested with the intended audiences.

68

Establish Accountability

  • Include health literacy improvement criteria in program evaluation.
  • Implement health literacy metrics.
69

Establish Accountability

Sample metrics

Our office will:

  • Apply user-centered design principles to 75% of new Web pages created after January 2006.
  • Ensure that all documents intended for the public are reviewed by a plain language expert.
  • Provide all new employees with training in cultural competency and health literacy within 6 months of their date of hire.

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70

HEALTH LITERACY

Integrating Health Literacy Into Your Work at HHS

71

Integrating Health Literacy Into Your Work at HHS

  • Communicate with the public.
  • Work with grantees and contractors.
  • Conduct and promote research.
  • Manage staff and programs.
  • Work with external stakeholders and partners.
72

Communicating With the Public

HHS communication functions include:

  • Responding to public inquiries
  • Developing public health messages/campaigns
  • Developing materials, publications, Web sites
  • Improving public access to evidence-based health information
  • Promoting and disseminating messages, materials, recommendations, and guidelines
  • Working with the media/press
  • Acting as public liaisons
  • Developing and implementing communication plans
  • Providing health research results
  • Speechwriting
  • Contributing to professional and academic publications


73

Communicating With the Public

Example: Working with the media

  • Write press releases aimed at the general public; use plain language.
  • Provide journalists with access to health literacy resources:
    • Create and post a health literacy "backgrounder" for journalists online (focus on data and news "hooks").
  • Highlight health literacy angle embedded in routine stories.
74

Working With Grantees and Contractors

  • Require health literacy expertise as part of the skill set for the teams awarded contracts.
  • Encourage grantees to address health literacy issues in their work plans and deliverables.
  • Include health literacy improvement as a topic in all technical assistance and materials development grants.
75

Working With Grantees and Contractors

Example:

Ask Funding Opportunity Announcement applicants to explain how their projects will contribute to meeting the health literacy objectives in Healthy People 2010.

76

Promoting Research

Integrating health literacy into research agendas:

  • Review research portfolios.
  • Convene research agenda-setting meetings for your topics:
    • Include colleagues from across HHS who share responsibility for these topics.
  • Identify health literacy research questions.
  • Communicate research findings to health professionals and the public (shared function with Communication staff).
77

Promoting Research

Example:

  • Make presentations at scholarly meetings.

    • Organize symposia and sessions on health literacy at annual professional association meetings.
  • Publish in professional journals.
78

Managing Staff and Programs

  • Incorporate health literacy improvement into performance plans, GPRA, and PART.
  • Include health literacy activities in budget requests.
  • Communicate the importance of health literacy improvement to staff.
79

Managing Staff and Programs

Example:

Conduct a senior-level briefing at your office or agency:

  • Include formal presentation and handouts.
  • Tie health literacy improvement to your specific mission, goals, and objectives.
  • Make specific recommendations.
80

Working With External Stakeholders and Partners

External stakeholders and partners include:

  • Healthcare professional organizations
  • Patient advocacy and support organizations
  • Consumer advocacy organizations
  • State, local, and tribal governments
  • Federal departments and agencies
  • Academic institutions
  • Industry trade organizations
  • Media vendors and associations
81

Working With External Partners

Arrangements may be:

  • Formal (e.g., Collaborative Research and Development Agreements and signed letters of agreement)
  • Informal collaboration

In both cases, agencies can encourage partners to:

  • Conduct user-centered research.
  • Evaluate the impact of enhanced understandability.
82

Working With External Stakeholders

  • Include representatives from your target population in planning, implementation, and evaluation.
  • Be sure to include organizations that represent/serve populations with limited literacy skills.
83

Working With External Stakeholders and Partners

Examples:

When you are soliciting proposals for presentations at HHS-sponsored events, state your interest in receiving presentations that address health literacy issues.

84

Who Is Responsible for Improving Health Literacy?

A health literate America is a society in which health systems and institutions take responsibility for providing clear communication and adequate support to facilitate health-promoting actions based on understanding.

—Institute of Medicine, 2004

85

Who Is Responsible for Improving Health Literacy?

  • Our job as HHS employees is to protect the health of all Americans.
  • Healthcare providers, public health professionals, health policy makers, and health administrators are all responsible for improving health literacy.
86

Who Is Responsible for Improving Health Literacy?

We are!

87

HEALTH LITERACY

Resources

88

Resources

89

Resources

90

Resources

91

Resources

 

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