PAG Midcourse Report: Strategies to Increase Physical Activity Among Youth

Introduction

Midcourse Report Front Page

The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Midcourse Report: Strategies to Increase Physical Activity Among Youth [PDF - 2.2 MB] identifies interventions that can help increase physical activity in youth ages 3–17 years across a variety of settings. The primary audiences for the report are policymakers, health care and public health professionals.

The report summarizes intervention strategies based on the evidence from a review-of-reviews literature review and is organized into five settings where youth live, learn, and play:

Two girls swimming in pool, boy on bicycle wearing helmet
  • School
  • Preschool and childcare
  • Community
  • Family and home
  • Primary health care

Index

PAG Midcourse Report Subcommittee

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius and Assistant Secretary for Health Howard Koh approved the creation of a subcommittee of the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition to complete the PAG Midcourse Report. The PAG Midcourse Report Subcommittee [PDF - 281 KB] was composed of ten physical activity experts from a variety of sectors and backgrounds.

President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition Webinar

During a live webinar on December 13, 2012, PAG Midcourse Report Chair, Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey presented the PAG Midcourse Report Subcommittee's findings and recommendations to the President's Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition.

Resources

All materials are free to download, print, and share.

The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Midcourse Report: Strategies to Increase Physical Activity Among Youth [PDF - 2.2 MB] identifies interventions that can help increase physical activity in youth ages 3–17 years across a variety of settings. The primary audiences for the report are policymakers, health care and public health professionals.

The PAG Midcourse Report infographic [JPG - 923 KB] [PDF - 1.3 MB] illustrates the five settings described in the report and highlights opportunities to increase physical activity throughout the day.

Spanish version [PDF - 1.09 MB]

The youth factsheet [PDF - 381 KB] is a 1-page desk reference that summarizes the PAG recommendations for youth ages 6 to 17 years, and provides examples of various physical activities for this age group.

Spanish version [PDF - 1.25 MB]

Frequently Asked Questions

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Why was the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (PAG) Midcourse Report developed?

Since the 2008 PAG, stakeholders have encouraged HHS to update the Guidelines on a regular basis. The PAG Midcourse Report was developed to build on the 2008 PAG by exploring the science on a particular area of public health concern, and providing information to stakeholders that supports physical activity-related efforts across the nation.

What is the intended purpose of the PAG Midcourse Report?

The purpose of the PAG Midcourse Report is to present information and recommendations for increasing physical activity levels in America’s youth. Based on a review-of-reviews, the PAG Midcourse Report describes intervention strategies that can increase physical activity among youth ages 3 to 17 years in various settings where youth live, learn and play. The report organizes findings into five key settings that provide important opportunities to increase activity: school, preschool and childcare, community, family and home, and primary health care.

Family swimming in a pool, boy in a wheelchair holding a basketball

Does the PAG Midcourse Report change the 2008 PAG recommendations for adult and youth physical activity?

While the PAG Midcourse Report supports the 2008 PAG, it does not change the type and amount of physical activity recommended in the Guidelines. Children and adolescents need at least 60 minutes (1 hour) or more of physical activity each day.

Why does the PAG Midcourse Report focus on youth ages 3 to 17 years when the Physical Activity Guidelines are intended for Americans 6 years and older?

Since development of the 2008 Guidelines, new research has enhanced our understanding of physical activity in early childhood.  The PAG Midcourse Report describes current science on children ages 3 to 5 years to support on-going efforts to increase activity levels in young Americans.

Boy climbing jungle gym, four kids playing soccer

Are there new Guidelines for youth ages 3 to 6 years?

The PAG Midcourse Report does not modify existing PAG recommendations. The Guidelines are intended for Americans ages 6 years and older.