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Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015

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Comments submitted to the federal government on the Scientific Report of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee

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Anonymous Comment ID #1609

02/23/2015

I thank you for acknowledging the power of plant-based diets to fight obesity and reduce the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, and other common health problems. I look forward to seeing even stronger wording in favor of plant-based diets in the final 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

However, the report reversed decades of warnings against cholesterol that will invariably lead to confusion about the science. Decades of science have conclusively linked high-cholesterol foods to cardiovascular disease, which kills nearly 2,200 Americans daily. Yet the report disregarded scientific findings and deferred entirely to a 2013 report by the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology and one meta-analysis of egg consumption. In fact, the meta-analysis found Americans who eat one egg per day or more are 42 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes—which leads to cardiovascular disease.

I ask that the final guidelines continue to warn against cholesterol—found only in meat and dairy products, which are strongly linked to obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

The final guidelines should also remove wording recommending fish, which is frequently contaminated with mercury and PCBs, and dairy products, which recent evidence show do not "build strong bones" or protect against fractures.

Even with these flaws, the new Dietary Guidelines report is a major advance.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization: Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine
Topic:
  • Part A: Executive Summary

Anonymous Comment ID #1607

02/23/2015

I thank you for acknowledging the power of plant-based diets to fight obesity and reduce the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, and other common health problems. I look forward to seeing even stronger wording in favor of plant-based diets in the final 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

However, the report reversed decades of warnings against cholesterol that will invariably lead to confusion about the science. Decades of science have conclusively linked high-cholesterol foods to cardiovascular disease, which kills nearly 2,200 Americans daily. Yet the report disregarded scientific findings and deferred entirely to a 2013 report by the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology and one meta-analysis of egg consumption. In fact, the meta-analysis found Americans who eat one egg per day or more are 42 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes—which leads to cardiovascular disease.

I ask that the final guidelines continue to warn against cholesterol—found only in meat and dairy products, which are strongly linked to obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

The final guidelines should also remove wording recommending fish, which is frequently contaminated with mercury and PCBs, and dairy products, which recent evidence show do not "build strong bones" or protect against fractures.

Even with these flaws, the new Dietary Guidelines report is a major advance.

Affiliation: Educational Institution: Higher Education Organization: Santa Rosa Junior College
Topic:
  • Part A: Executive Summary

Satish Karandikar Comment ID #1608

02/23/2015

I thank you for acknowledging the power of plant-based diets to fight obesity and reduce the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, and other common health problems. I look forward to seeing even stronger wording in favor of plant-based diets in the final 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

However, the report reversed decades of warnings against cholesterol that will invariably lead to confusion about the science. Decades of science have conclusively linked high-cholesterol foods to cardiovascular disease, which kills nearly 2,200 Americans daily. Yet the report disregarded scientific findings and deferred entirely to a 2013 report by the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology and one meta-analysis of egg consumption. In fact, the meta-analysis found Americans who eat one egg per day or more are 42 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes—which leads to cardiovascular disease.

I ask that the final guidelines continue to warn against cholesterol—found only in meat and dairy products, which are strongly linked to obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

The final guidelines should also remove wording recommending fish, which is frequently contaminated with mercury and PCBs, and dairy products, which recent evidence show do not "build strong bones" or protect against fractures.

Even with these flaws, the new Dietary Guidelines report is a major advance. God bless!

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Part A: Executive Summary

Anonymous Comment ID #1606

02/23/2015

I thank you for acknowledging the power of plant-based diets to fight obesity and reduce the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, and other common health problems. I look forward to seeing even stronger wording in favor of plant-based diets in the final 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

However, the report reversed decades of warnings against cholesterol that will invariably lead to confusion about the science. Decades of science have conclusively linked high-cholesterol foods to cardiovascular disease, which kills nearly 2,200 Americans daily. Yet the report disregarded scientific findings and deferred entirely to a 2013 report by the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology and one meta-analysis of egg consumption. In fact, the meta-analysis found Americans who eat one egg per day or more are 42 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes—which leads to cardiovascular disease.

I ask that the final guidelines continue to warn against cholesterol—found only in meat and dairy products, which are strongly linked to obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

The final guidelines should also remove wording recommending fish, which is frequently contaminated with mercury and PCBs, and dairy products, which recent evidence show do not "build strong bones" or protect against fractures.

Even with these flaws, the new Dietary Guidelines report is a major advance.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Part A: Executive Summary

Kathlene Henry-Gorman Comment ID #1605

02/23/2015

I thank you for acknowledging the power of plant-based diets to fight obesity and reduce the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, and other common health problems. I look forward to seeing even stronger wording in favor of plant-based diets in the final 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

However, decades of science have conclusively linked high-cholesterol foods to cardiovascular disease, which kills nearly 2,200 Americans daily. The report is not supported by current scientific findings and deferred entirely to a 2013 report by the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology and one meta-analysis of egg consumption. In fact, the meta-analysis found Americans who eat one egg per day or more are 42 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes—which leads to cardiovascular disease.

I ask that the final guidelines continue to warn against cholesterol—found only in meat and dairy products, which are strongly linked to obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

The final guidelines should also remove wording recommending fish, which is frequently contaminated with mercury and PCBs, and dairy products, which recent evidence show do not "build strong bones" or protect against fractures.

Even with these flaws, the new Dietary Guidelines report is a major advance, and a huge step in the right direction. To emphasis plant based dietary guidelines, is both positive for the health of every citizen, as well as the environment. It encourages a move away from the established factory farming setting many animals find themselves in, it helps to mitigate the damage caused by climate change and supports the growing sentiment that many consumers have adopted.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization: PCRM
Topic:
  • Part A: Executive Summary

Anonymous Comment ID #1604

02/23/2015

I thank you for acknowledging the power of plant-based diets to fight obesity and reduce the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, and other common health problems.

I have been vegetarian for 8 years and in the last year, I am vegan. Needless to say I had before a ton of health problems, even though I was much younger. Used to have heart palpitations, constipation, very often got sick with flue and remained with coughing for months. Since I switched on plant-based diet, my health improved significantly, my level of energy and work efficiency is at the all time high, and I am an active, sport oriented individual at almost 58 years of age. I rarely step into the doctors' office maybe every other year for routine blood tests, and this is only because my family prompts me to do a check-up for peace of mind. I practice snow-boarding, roller-skating and biking (I bike to work every day).

I look forward to seeing even stronger wording in favor of plant-based diets in the final 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. You owe this to generations to come, to have a healthy, happy workforce with minimum expense on health which we know is now at all times high.

However, the report reversed decades of warnings against cholesterol that will invariably lead to confusion about the science. Decades of science have conclusively linked high-cholesterol foods to cardiovascular disease, which kills nearly 2,200 Americans daily.

Researchers and Pharmaceuticals are spending tons of money to correct heart disease, which still affect a high number of the American population and around the world. From lowering cholesterol medications to valves and pacemakers, plus high pay interventional cardiologists who become rich due to the poor diet and lack of exercise of a large percentage of individuals.

Yet the report disregarded scientific findings and deferred entirely to a 2013 report by the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology and one meta-analysis of egg consumption. In fact, the meta-analysis found Americans who eat one egg per day or more are 42 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes—which leads to cardiovascular disease.

I ask that the final guidelines continue to warn against cholesterol—found only in meat and dairy products, which are strongly linked to obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

The final guidelines should also remove wording recommending fish, which is frequently contaminated with mercury and PCBs, and dairy products, which recent evidence show do not "build strong bones" or protect against fractures.

Even with these flaws, the new Dietary Guidelines report is a major advance.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Part A: Executive Summary

Anonymous Comment ID #1601

02/23/2015

Thank you for acknowledging the power of plant-based diets to fight obesity and reduce the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, and other common health problems. I look forward to seeing even stronger wording in favor of plant-based diets in the final 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

However, the report reversed decades of warnings against cholesterol that will invariably lead to confusion about the science. Decades of science have conclusively linked high-cholesterol foods to cardiovascular disease, which kills nearly 2,200 Americans daily. Yet the report disregarded scientific findings and deferred entirely to a 2013 report by the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology and one meta-analysis of egg consumption. In fact, the meta-analysis found Americans who eat one egg per day or more are 42 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes—which leads to cardiovascular disease.

I ask that the final guidelines continue to warn against cholesterol—found only in meat and dairy products, which are strongly linked to obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

The final guidelines should also remove wording recommending fish, which is frequently contaminated with mercury and PCBs, and dairy products, which recent evidence show do not "build strong bones" or protect against fractures.

Even with these flaws, the new Dietary Guidelines report is a major advance.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Part A: Executive Summary

Jordan Kasteler Comment ID #1602

02/23/2015

I thank you for acknowledging the power of plant-based diets to fight obesity and reduce the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, and other common health problems. I look forward to seeing even stronger wording in favor of plant-based diets in the final 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
However, the report reversed decades of warnings against cholesterol that will invariably lead to confusion about the science. Decades of science have conclusively linked high-cholesterol foods to cardiovascular disease, which kills nearly 2,200 Americans daily. Yet the report disregarded scientific findings and deferred entirely to a 2013 report by the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology and one meta-analysis of egg consumption. In fact, the meta-analysis found Americans who eat one egg per day or more are 42 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes—which leads to cardiovascular disease.
I ask that the final guidelines continue to warn against cholesterol—found only in meat and dairy products, which are strongly linked to obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.
The final guidelines should also remove wording recommending fish, which is frequently contaminated with mercury and PCBs, and dairy products, which recent evidence show do not "build strong bones" or protect against fractures.
Even with these flaws, the new Dietary Guidelines report is a major advance.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization: Red Door Interactive
Topic:
  • Part A: Executive Summary

Lucile Welch Comment ID #1603

02/23/2015

I thank you for acknowledging the power of plant-based diets to fight obesity and reduce the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, and other common health problems. I look forward to seeing even stronger wording in favor of plant-based diets in the final 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
However, the report reversed decades of warnings against cholesterol that will invariably lead to confusion about the science. Decades of science have conclusively linked high-cholesterol foods to cardiovascular disease, which kills nearly 2,200 Americans daily. Yet the report disregarded scientific findings and deferred entirely to a 2013 report by the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology and one meta-analysis of egg consumption. In fact, the meta-analysis found Americans who eat one egg per day or more are 42 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes—which leads to cardiovascular disease.
I ask that the final guidelines continue to warn against cholesterol—found only in meat and dairy products, which are strongly linked to obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.
The final guidelines should also remove wording recommending fish, which is frequently contaminated with mercury and PCBs, and dairy products, which recent evidence show do not "build strong bones" or protect against fractures.
Even with these flaws, the new Dietary Guidelines report is a major advance.
Sincerely,
Lucile C. Welch

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Part A: Executive Summary

Anonymous Comment ID #1599

02/23/2015

I thank you for acknowledging the power of plant-based diets to fight obesity and reduce the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, and other common health problems. I look forward to seeing even stronger wording in favor of plant-based diets in the final 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

However, the report reversed decades of warnings against cholesterol that will invariably lead to confusion about the science. Decades of science have conclusively linked high-cholesterol foods to cardiovascular disease, which kills nearly 2,200 Americans daily. Yet the report disregarded scientific findings and deferred entirely to a 2013 report by the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology and one meta-analysis of egg consumption. In fact, the meta-analysis found Americans who eat one egg per day or more are 42 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes—which leads to cardiovascular disease.

I ask that the final guidelines continue to warn against cholesterol—found only in meat and dairy products, which are strongly linked to obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

The final guidelines should also remove wording recommending fish, which is frequently contaminated with mercury and PCBs, and dairy products, which recent evidence show do not "build strong bones" or protect against fractures.

Even with these flaws, the new Dietary Guidelines report is a major advance.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization: PCRM
Topic:
  • Part A: Executive Summary
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