Skip to main content Skip to section navigation
DietaryGuidelines.gov logo

Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015

Read Comments

Instructions: You can browse comments by topic, or search by comment text, organization, affiliation, or comment ID. The search phrase must match in its entirety for a result to be returned. Searches are not case-sensitive.


  1 2 3 4 5  ...   

Anonymous Comment ID #652

09/02/2014

Dear Dr. Millen and Members of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee:
In response to committee discussions regarding lactose intolerance during recent meetings of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC), I’d like to call to the committee’s attention the main takeaways of the expert panel at the National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference on Lactose Intolerance and Health. While the committee has agreed to the importance of dairy in healthy eating patterns, there were also concerns expressed about special recommendations for individuals with lactose intolerance. However, the overall key finding of the NIH expert panel was that, in most cases lactose intolerance shouldn’t limit dairy consumption when managed properly and dairy food intake should be the first intervention, even in the setting of lactose intolerance.
According to the expert panel, “Many individuals with real or perceived lactose intolerance avoid dairy and ingest inadequate amounts of calcium and vitamin D, which may predispose them to decreased bone accrual, osteoporosis, and other adverse health outcomes. In most cases, individuals do not need to eliminate dairy consumption completely.”
With so many misperceptions about lactose intolerance on the whole, it’s important that the committee consider the full findings of this report. As a young adult, I was advised by a well-intentioned health professional to avoid dairy foods due to lactose intolerance. Unfortunately, like many patients, I too experienced firsthand the unintended health consequences of dairy avoidance that resolved when I began to follow the clinical strategies outlined in the Consensus report.
According to the NIH expert panel’s final statement, “The available evidence suggests that adults and adolescents who have been diagnosed with lactose malabsorption could ingest at least 12 grams of lactose when administered in a single dose (equivalent to the lactose content found in 1 cup of milk) with no or minor symptoms. Individuals with lactose malabsorption can tolerate larger amounts of lactose if ingested with meals and distributed throughout the day.”
As a gastroenterologist with specialized training in Clinical Nutrition, I share the common goals of preventing nutrient deficiencies and improving the nutritional quality of diets in the US, particularly for the patients under my care. The inclusion of dairy foods as part of a healthy eating plan is a very effective way to achieve these goals and minimize the risk of certain diet-preventable chronic disease states, even in the setting of lactose intolerance. My personal and clinical experiences are consistent with the panel’s finding. Therefore, I strongly support the findings of the NIH consensus panel report.
The final copy of the NIH statement can be found at the following link:
http://consensus.nih.gov/2010/images/lactose/lactose_finalstatement.pdf
I appreciate the committee’s consideration of this most important topic.
Sincerely,
Jeanette Keith, M.D.
Decatur Gastroenterology Associates

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization: Decatur Gastroenterology Associates
Topic:
  • Food Groups (Fruits, Vegetables, Grains, Dairy, Protein Foods)

Jill Nicholls PhD Comment ID #651

09/01/2014

The National Dairy Council® (NDC) appreciates the opportunity to submit comments for consideration by the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) in response to the Federal Register notice (79 FR 29770) issued May 23, 2014.

The NDC, the non-profit organization founded by U.S. dairy farmers, is committed to nutrition research and education about dairy’s role in the diet and health and wellness. NDC provides science-based dairy nutrition information to, and in collaboration with, a variety of stakeholders committed to fostering a healthier nation, including health professionals, educators, school nutrition directors, academia and industry. Established in 1915, NDC comprises a staff of registered dietitians and nutrition research and communications experts across the country.

The attached comments are offered regarding the important topic of bone health, as DGAC Subcommittee 2 has indicated it will review the literature on Dietary Patterns and Bone as they evaluate the current science on health and nutrition in support of developing national food-based dietary recommendations. The comments rely on five review papers related to dairy products and bone health published between 2011 and 2014 by experts in the field.

Jean Ragalie, RD
President, National Dairy Council

Gregory D. Miller, PhD
Executive Vice President, National Dairy Council

Affiliation: Other Organization: National Dairy Council
Topic:
  • Food Groups (Fruits, Vegetables, Grains, Dairy, Protein Foods)
  • Micronutrients (Sodium, Potassium, Vitamin D, Calcium, Iron)

Jill Nicholls PhD Comment ID #650

09/01/2014

The National Dairy Council® (NDC) appreciates the opportunity to submit comments for consideration by the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) in response to the Federal Register notice (79 FR 29770) issued May 23, 2014.

The NDC, the non-profit organization founded by U.S. dairy farmers, is committed to nutrition research and education about dairy’s role in the diet and health and wellness. NDC provides science-based dairy nutrition information to, and in collaboration with, a variety of stakeholders committed to fostering a healthier nation, including health professionals, educators, school nutrition directors, academia and industry. Established in 1915, NDC comprises a staff of registered dietitians and nutrition research and communications experts across the country.

During meeting 4 of the DGAC, committee members discussed non-dairy sources of calcium. Historically, the Milk Group has been based on the calcium content of milk and milk products, however, milk is a key contributor of many nutrients. For example, milk is the number one food source of the shortfall nutrients calcium, vitamin D and potassium in the diet of both adults and children, and cheese is the number two food source of calcium, after milk. For children, milk is the leading source of nine essential nutrients (protein, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, vitamins A, B12, D and riboflavin), and is an invaluable source of key nutrients during growth and development. Therefore, nutritional evaluation of milk alternatives is most informative when done in the context of dietary patterns, allowing appropriate comparisons that take into account total calorie and nutrient contributions of dairy foods and proposed alternatives. The diet modeling approach was used by the 2010 DGAC Nutrient Adequacy Subcommittee to evaluate possible milk and milk product alternatives identified by the 2005 DGAC as options for those who choose not to consume dairy foods. Findings were reported in Appendix E-3.6: Milk Group and Alternatives: Food Pattern Modeling Analysis of the 2010 DGAC report and highlights of the report are included in the attached comments.

Jean Ragalie-Carr, RD
President, National Dairy Council

Gregory D. Miller, PhD
Executive Vice President, National Dairy Council

Affiliation: Other Organization: National Dairy Council
Topic:
  • Food Groups (Fruits, Vegetables, Grains, Dairy, Protein Foods)
  • Micronutrients (Sodium, Potassium, Vitamin D, Calcium, Iron)

Steven Kirsch Comment ID #649

09/01/2014

The CNPP study that subcommittee 2 relied upon is seriously flawed.

Credible studies (and my own personal experience and the advice and experience of experts I know) indicate that low carb diets are superior for body mass, diabetes, and CVD.

See the two attachments for a critique of the CNPP review and the Subcommittee 2 methodology.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Eating Patterns-Diets (USDA Food Patterns, DASH, Vegetarian, Low Carb, Hi-Protein, etc.)

Anonymous Comment ID #648

08/31/2014

My Plate concept is WONDERFUL.Thank you for the idea.
Please consider adding
1. a salad and water ( option : such as iced tea, hot tea - no calories)
as a beverage to the side of the plate to make it
a complete meal.
2. a vegetable base soup for winter?? not cream soup.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization: None
Topic:
  • Food Groups (Fruits, Vegetables, Grains, Dairy, Protein Foods)
  • Water & Beverages (Non-alcoholic)

Hari Simran Kaur Khalsa Comment ID #647

08/30/2014

I am currently involved in a project to define for my Church, which is Church of Sikh Dharma 3HO, our Lacto-Vegetarain Khalsa Family Meal Plan. We were founded as a church in 1969, and we take vows, in stages, which in part, include a vow to eat Lacto-Vegetarian. I am not an official in my church. I have found the USDA guidelines for vegetarians and generally for all on line, to be excellent and helpful and the on-line programs for developing personal meal plan balance, to be very inspiring and accurate, scientific and helpful.

We as a church, we have struggled with offering guidance and leadership to ourselves, vis a vis, our Lacto-Vegetarian Meal Plan. I am offering some start up leadership for this, based on USDA guidelines provided for daily intake requirements, and I am looking at our classic recipes, from our church, with a mind to amp up their levels of intake for lacot-vegetarian protein, and for an accurate balance of all levels for the 5 food groups and key nutrients.

I am currently designing a rotating 14 day Meal Plan with this in mind, where each meal for all three meals, plus two snacks a day, reflect the accurate intake, for all 5 food groups, and where the level intake for each of the 5 food groups, is stated with that day's meal plan. I am basing this on a family of 4, being 2 adults and 2 children.

I also am aware that prior to 24 months, these infants and infant toddlers, have requirements, and are eating milk until 4-6 months, and thereafter pureed foods. I will create a 14 day meal plan for lacto-vegetarian infants, to parallel the one for the family of 4 above, and dovetail with it.

After submitting this work to my church approval process, where it will be put in front of our leading health professionals, from our church, I am wondering if there is also a way that our US government, per this website, can have someone read my offering with a critical eye, and make comments?

We feel as a church, that we will be much more grounded in the science of USDA approved nutritional guidelines for our church Lacto-Vegetarian Meal Plan, by doing the above. We also have a secular outreach from our church, which offers yoga and yoga camps, where we serve our lacto-vegetarian meals, and these are a public venue. I feel we will obviously be better set, to offer our public, scientifically sound and structured lacto-vegetarian repast, as we finish this whole process outlined above, successfully.

If you could recommend a committee or particular person that I could be in touch with as I noted before, I would appreciate it. My email address is harisim2011@gmail.com

I would also like to note, that I am basing the identification of the amounts and levels of all 5 food groups,----1) based on what is given on the cdc website vis a vis protein, which is around 50 grams of protein per day, for both adults and children, (and as 50 grams of protein is actually under 2 ounces, this means that protein is found mixed in all of its sources, with especially carbs, as in pinto beans), 2) the vegetarian conversion chart for protein foods, given on www.choosemyplate.com as a link; 3) as well as I am using what the packaging says, for grams of protein per serving, from USDA standard packaging for tofu, soyrizo, milk, wheatmeat, nuts, grains, dairy, and et al.

Thank you, Hari Simran Kaur Khalsa 310 425-4496

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization: self
Topic:
  • Eating Patterns-Diets (USDA Food Patterns, DASH, Vegetarian, Low Carb, Hi-Protein, etc.)

Matthew Budoff Professor Comment ID #645

08/29/2014

As a board-certified cardiologist, I consult with patients each day on how their diets can have a direct impact on their cardiovascular health. One of the most important foods that I recommend to every patient is seafood, which is rich in omega-3s and is proven to reduce their risk of developing heart disease. With heart disease now accounting for nearly one in every four deaths in the United States, the focus on preventative measures – like diet – is more important than ever. In fact, studies have shown that eating fish at least twice a week can reduce the risk of dying from a heart attack by 36 percent. So, why am I writing to you today? I am concerned that advice about seafood has often been ridden with caveats. As a result of confusion over past advice, the majority of Americans are eating less than one serving of the recommended two to three seafood servings each week. Putting additional qualifiers on seafood will only add to past confusion and encourage limited seafood consumption. We would be remiss if we provided muddled information that held Americans back from including an essential food in their diets. Our goal should be to provide clear, concise dietary recommendations in the best interest of the people’s health. I urge you to consider the health of Americans – my patients – and ensure that advice is not nuanced, rather encourages all Americans to eat two to three servings of seafood each week that is critical to their cardiovascular health.

Affiliation: Educational Institution: Higher Education Organization: UCLA School of Medicine
Topic:
  • Sustainability

Anonymous Comment ID #644

08/28/2014

The National WIC Association (NWA) is the non-profit education arm and education voice of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Education Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), the nearly 9 million women and young children served by WIC and the 12,000 service provider Agencies who are the frontlines of WIC’s public health nutrition services for the nation’s nutritionally at-risk mothers and young children. The NWA has made recommendations pertaining to the DGAC’s SC 2: Dietary Patterns, Foods and Nutrients, and Health Outcomes. Specifically, our recommendations focus on overall dietary pattern, restaurant foods, portion sizes, sodium, added sugars, trans fatty acids, saturated fat, dietary cholesterol, whole grains, red and processed meats, fruits and vegetables, dairy products, and breastfeeding. See Attachment #1 for our specific recommendations and references.

Affiliation: Professional Association Organization: National WIC Association
Topic:
  • Eating Patterns-Diets (USDA Food Patterns, DASH, Vegetarian, Low Carb, Hi-Protein, etc.)
  • Food Groups (Fruits, Vegetables, Grains, Dairy, Protein Foods)

Tina Ruggiero MS, RD, LD Comment ID #643

08/28/2014

Request 5-2. As a registered dietitian, I know first-hand how important it is to eat a nutrient-rich diet, including seafood. A power-house food, eating seafood at least two times per week has been shown to provide numerous health benefits. For all Americans, a seafood-rich diet can help reduce the risk of heart disease. In fact, studies have shown that eating fish at least twice a week can reduce the risk of dying from a heart attack by 36 percent. Additionally, studies have shown that pregnant and breastfeeding women who eat seafood at least twice a week have a reduced risk for anxiety and depression, and their developing babies have an increase in cognitive development. Unfortunately, because of confusion over past advice, the majority of Americans are eating less than one serving of the recommended two to three seafood servings each week. Putting additional restrictions or qualifiers on seafood will only add to past confusion and encourage limited seafood consumption. We would be remiss if we provided muddled information that, as a consequence, held Americans back from including an essential food in their diet. Our goal should be to provide clear and concise dietary recommendations that are in the best interest of the people’s health. Remove the nuances and encourage all Americans to eat more seafood every day.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Sustainability

Anonymous Comment ID #642

08/28/2014

I switched from DGA diet to low carb, high fat.

I ate UNLIMITED amounts of saturated fat.

Result: LDL-P is in top 2% of the country, i.e., no heart disease risk. Unbelievable weight loss. All diabetes numbers reversed to normal range.

Those results are IMPOSSIBLE to achieve under the current DGA.

And according to the DGA rationale, I should be at high risk for heart disease, not low risk.

See attached for details.

Affiliation: Individual/Professional Organization:
Topic:
  • Eating Patterns-Diets (USDA Food Patterns, DASH, Vegetarian, Low Carb, Hi-Protein, etc.)
  1 2 3 4 5  ...   

This graphic notice,External Link: You are leaving Health.gov, means that you are leaving the ODPHP/Health Communication site and entering a non-Federal Web site. View full disclaimer.

 

This site is coordinated by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Office of the Secretary, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.