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Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005

Nutrition Service Providers Guide

www.healthierus.gov/dietaryguidelines
www.aoa.gov/prof/aoaprog/nutrition/nutrition.asp

April, 2006

Department of Health and Human Services
Administration on Aging

Acknowledgements

This Nutrition Service Provider's Guide is an outgrowth of the commitment of the Assistant Secretary for Aging Josefina G. Carbonell to translating evidence-based knowledge into every day practice. M. Yvonne Jackson, Ph.D., R.D., Director of the Office of American Indians, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians Programs, Administration on Aging (AoA), and Jean L. Lloyd, M.S., R.D., National Nutritionist, AoA provided the primary leadership in the development of the Nutrition Service Provider's Guide.

We recognize that without the support of Assistant Secretary for Aging Josefina G. Carbonell and Captain Penelope Royall, P.T., M.S.W., Director of the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) this document would not have been completed. We want to thank the ODPHP personnel, Christine R. Dobday, Kimberly F. Stitzel, M.S., R.D., and Kathryn Y. McMurry, M.S. for professional expertise, responsiveness, and good cheer under pressure.

We want to thank the Nancy S. Wellman Ph.D., R.D., F.A.D.A., Director, National Resource Center on Nutrition, Physical Activity and Aging at Florida International University, and her staff: Barbara Kamp, M.S., R.D., Project Coordinator; and graduate students, Shannon Dukes, Melissa Coel, and Nicola Guess. Without their original contributions, particularly the menus and analysis, their patience with the iterative process, and their fine-tuning of the final drafts, this document could not have been completed.

We thank AoA Regional Nutritionists, Florestine Johnson, M.S., R.D., L.D. and Joseph Carlin, M.S., R.D., L.D.N., F.A.D.A. for their ideas, comments on the applicability to state, tribal and local programs and review.

We appreciate the time, effort, valuable comments, specific suggestions and document review by the following State Nutritionists/Administrators: Shirley Chao, M.S., R.D., L.D., Nutritionist, Massachusetts Executive Office of Elder Affairs; Violet Henry, M.S, RD., Public Health Nutritionist, California Department of Aging; Jennifer Keeley, M.S., R.D., C.D., Nutrition Coordinator, Wisconsin Bureau of Aging and Long Term Care Resources; Kimberley Quigley, M.S., R.D., L.D., Nutrition Therapist IV, Oklahoma Department of Human Services, Aging Services; Suhda Reddy, M.S., R.D., LD, Chief Nutritionist, Georgia Department of Human Resources, Division of Aging Services.

And finally, we want to thank the participants at the national N4A and National Association of Nutrition and Aging Services Programs conferences that provided initial guidance at the beginning of the project.


Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005 - Older Adults

Part I: Information for Nutrition Service Providers

I. Purpose

The purpose of this document is to provide technical assistance for implementing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs) in the Older Americans Act (OAA) nutrition programs. This technical assistance provides guidance in menu planning, food purchasing, food production, and food service. Since programs differ, this guidance should be tailored to meet the unique needs and situation of each program. This guidance should supplement the input from a registered dietitian (RD) as well as State and Tribal policies, procedures and guidance.

II. History and Process

The DGAs allow the federal government to speak with one voice when presenting advice for healthy Americans ages two years and over about making food choices that promote health and prevent disease. All federally-issued dietary guidance for the general public is required to be consistent with the DGAs.

In addition to a consistent message, the DGAs establish the direction for all government nutrition programs, including research, education, food assistance, labeling, and nutrition promotion. The OAA requires the Elderly Nutrition Program (ENP) funded under Title III and Title VI to provide meals that: 1) comply with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans; and 2) provide a minimum of 33 1/3 percent of the daily recommended dietary allowances if one meal per day is provided, a minimum of 66 2/3 percent of the allowance if two meals per day are provided, and 100 percent of the allowance if three meals per day are provided (OAA, Sections 339 and 614, www.aoa.gov/about/legbudg/oaa/legbudg_oaa.asp). The Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) are one of the components within the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs), established by the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. The DRIs are nutrient reference values.

The National Nutrition Monitoring and Related Research Act of 1990 (7 U.S.C. 5341) requires the Secretaries of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to jointly publish a report entitled, Nutrition and Your Health: Dietary Guidelines for Americans, at least every five years. In preparation for this report, HHS and USDA appoint a Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee comprised of prominent experts in nutrition and health to review current scientific and medical knowledge and recommend revision to the Secretaries. The Sixth Edition of the DGAs was released in January 2005.

The DGAs translate the nutrient based recommendations from the DRIs into food, diet, and physical activity recommendations. The premise of the DGAs is that nutrient needs should be met primarily through consuming foods and that the DGAs should provide guidance in obtaining all nutrients needed for growth and health. The food and physical activity based DGAs provide the evidence-based advice for promoting health and decreasing the risk of major chronic diseases through healthy diet and increasing physical activity. The recommendations are inter-related and mutually dependent. They should be used together in the context of planning an overall healthful diet.

III. Importance of the Dietary Guidelines for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Good nutrition is vital to good health. Major causes of morbidity and mortality in the U.S. are related to poor diet and a sedentary lifestyle. Specific diseases and conditions linked to poor diet include cardiovascular disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, type 2-diabetes, overweight and obesity, osteoporosis, constipation, diverticular disease, iron deficiency anemia, oral disease, malnutrition, and some cancers. Lack of physical activity has been associated with cardiovascular disease, hypertension, overweight and obesity, osteoporosis, diabetes, and certain cancers. Furthermore, muscle strengthening and improving balance can reduce falls and increase functional status among older adults. Together with physical activity, a high-quality diet that does not provide excess calories should enhance the health of most individuals.

There is a growing body of evidence which demonstrates that following a diet that complies with the DGAs may reduce the risk of chronic disease. Studies indicate that about 16 percent and 9 percent of mortality from any cause in men and women over age 45, respectively, could be eliminated by the adoption of more desirable dietary behaviors.

IV. Implementation of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans

The OAA places responsibility for implementing the DGAs on the State Units on Aging (SUAs) and Indian Tribal Organizations (ITOs) [OAA Sections 339 and 614]. SUAs and ITOs may develop additional guidance to assure implementation of these requirements.

Older adults need nutritious, tasty, culturally appropriate, and safe meals for successful aging. The DGAs help assure that appropriate food choices are made to ensure the DRIs are met in program meals. SUAs, ITOs, area agencies on aging and local nutrition service providers are uniquely positioned to impact the health and functional independence of older adults by providing nutrient dense meals and linking them with opportunities to enhance and maintain their physical activity.

Although the guidance in this document is targeted to the national aging network, it is applicable to planning meals and services in other programs and settings that serve older adults, such as assisted living facilities, adult day care, adult care homes, home and community based Medicaid Waiver programs, state, tribal, and locally funded home and community based care programs, and nursing homes. This document is designed to be flexible enough to accommodate the range of food preferences and unique nutrition and health needs of specific populations of older adults. It is designed to provide a common basis for implementing the DGAs. This document is grouped into general topics focusing on key recommendations. Each general topic has sections that provide the following information:

Older Adults
Dietary Guideline: Adequate Nutrients Within Calorie Needs

Key Recommendation: Variety and Nutrient Density

Program Planning Considerations for OAA Nutrition Programs

Tips for Meal Planning

Resources

Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005
Appendix A: Eating Patterns. Appendix A-1 DASH Eating Plan, Appendix A-2 USDA Food Guide. Available at:
www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/appendixA.htm

Appendix A: Eating Patterns. Appendix A-1 DASH Eating Plan. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office; 2005: 51-52.

Appendix A: Eating Patterns. Appendix A-2 USDA Food Guide. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office; 2005: 53-54.

Appendix B: Food Sources of selected nutrients. B-1 Potassium, B-2 Vitamin E, B-3 Iron, B-4 Non-Dairy Sources of Calcium, B-5 Calcium, B-6 Vitamin A, B-7 Magnesium, B-8 Dietary Fiber. Available at:
www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/appendixB.htm

5 A Day for Better Health Program
Tips. 1991. Available at:
www.5aday.gov/recipes/tips.html

Savor the Season. 1991. Available at:
www.5aday.gov/recipes/savor_the_season

Older American Nutrition Program Toolkit
Chapter 4. Menu and Nutrition Requirements. Available at:
http://nutritionandaging.fiu.edu/OANP_Toolkit

USDA
Putting the Guidelines into practice. Available at:
www.usda.gov/cnpp/dietary_guidelines.html


Older Adults
Dietary Guideline: Adequate Nutrients Within Calorie Needs

Key Recommendation: Energy Intake

Program Planning Considerations for OAA Nutrition Programs

Tips for Meal Planning

Resources

Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005
Appendix A Eating Patterns. Appendix A-1 DASH Eating Plan, Appendix A-2 USDA Food Guide. Available at:
www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/appendixA.htm

National Heart, Blood and Lung Institute
The DASH Eating Plan. 2003. Available at:
www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/hbp/dash/

USDA
How much are you eating? 2002. Available at:
www.usda.gov/cnpp/Pubs/Brochures/

MyPyramid.gov

What counts as an ounce equivalent of grains? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/grains_counts.html

What counts as a cup of vegetables? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/vegetables_counts.html

What counts as a cup of fruit? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/fruits_counts.html

What counts as 1 cup in the milk group? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/milk_counts.html

What counts as an ounce equivalent in the meat and beans group? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/meat_counts.html

What counts as a teaspoon? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/oils_count.html


Older Adults
Dietary Guideline: Adequate Nutrients Within Calorie Needs

Key Recommendation for Specific Populations: Vitamin B12

Program Planning Considerations for OAA Nutrition Programs Tips for Meal Planning Resources

National Institute of Health: Office of Dietary Supplements
Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Vitamin B12. 2005. Available at:
http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/vitaminb12.asp


Dietary Guideline: Adequate Nutrients Within Calorie Needs
Key Recommendation for Specific Populations: Vitamin D

Program Planning Considerations for OAA Nutrition Programs

Tips for Meal Planning

Resources

National Institute of Health: Office of Dietary Supplements
Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Vitamin D. 2004. Available at:
http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/vitamind.asp

General Resources


National Institute on Aging
Good Nutrition: It's a way of life. 2005. Available at:
www.niapublications.org/engagepages/nutrition.asp

Older Americans Nutrition Program Toolkit
Chapter 4: Menu and Nutrition Requirements. 2003. Available at:
http://nutritionandaging.fiu.edu/OANP_Toolkit/


Dietary Guideline: Weight Management
Key Recommendation: Weight Management

Program Planning Considerations for OAA Nutrition Programs

Tips for Meal Planning

Resources

National Heart, Blood and Lung Institute
Obesity Education Initiative. Available at:
www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/oei/index.htm

Aim for a Healthy Weight. Available at:
www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/lose_wt/index.htm

HHS
Smallstep.gov. Available at:
www.smallstep.gov/

Weight-control Information Center
What is a Healthy Weight? 2002. Available at:
win.niddk.nih.gov/publications/young_heart.htm#healthyweight

U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Eating Well as We Age. 2001. Available at:
www.fda.gov/opacom/lowlit/eatage.html

American Academy of Family Physicians
DETERMINE Your Nutritional Health Checklist. 2005. Available at:
nutritionandaging.fiu.edu/downloads/NSI_checklist.pdf


Dietary Guideline: Physical Activity
Key Recommendations: Physical Activity

Program Planning Considerations for OAA Nutrition Programs

Tips for Program Planning

Resources

Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005
Table 3: Estimated Calorie Requirements for Each Gender and Age Group at Three Levels of Physical Activity. 2005:12. Available at:
www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/chapter2.htm#table3

Table 4: Calories/Hour Expended in Common Physical Activities. 2005:16. Available at:
www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/chapter3.htm#table4

Center for Disease Control
Physical Activity for Everyone: Recommendations: Are there special recommendations for older adults? Available at:
www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/physical/recommendations/older_adults.htm

Growing Stronger - Strength Training for Older Adults: Home. Available at:
www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/physical/growing_stronger/index.htm

National Institute on Aging
NIA Exercise Guide. Available at:
www.niapublications.org/exercisebook/toc.htm

National Institute on Health Senior Health
Exercise for Older Adults. Available at:
nihseniorhealth.gov/exercise/toc.html

You Can! - Steps to Healthier Aging is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Steps to a Healthier US initiative.
Available at:
www.aoa.gov/youcan/about/about.asp
Available at:
nutritionandaging.fiu.edu/

National Council on Aging: The Center for Healthy Aging
Available at:
www.healthyagingprograms.org/

USDA
MyPyramid.gov
What is physical activity? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/physical_activity.html

Why is physical activity important? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/physical_activity_why.html


Dietary Guideline: Food Groups to Encourage
Key Recommendations: Fruit and Vegetables

Program Planning Considerations for OAA Nutrition Programs

Tips for Meal Planning - Fruits

In general
At meals
Lunch/Dinner

Tips to Meal Planning – Vegetables

In general
At meals

Breakfast
Lunch/Dinner

Resources

Action Guide for Healthy Eating
Action List for Fruits and Vegetables. Available at:
www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/food/guideeat/fruitveg.html

USDA
Fabulous fruits, versatile vegetables. 2003. Available at:
www.usda.gov/cnpp/Pubs/Brochures/

MyPyramid.gov

What foods are in the vegetable group? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/vegetables.html

What counts as a cup of vegetables? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/vegetables_counts.html#

Tips to help you eat vegetables. 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/vegetables_tips.html

What foods are in the fruit group? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/fruits.html

What counts as a cup of fruit? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/fruits_counts.html#

Tips to help you eat fruit. 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/fruits_tips.html


Dietary Guideline: Food Groups to Encourage
Key Recommendation: Whole Grains

Program Planning Considerations for OAA Nutrition Programs

Tips for Meal Planning

Resources

USDA
Get on the grain train. 2002. Available at:
www.usda.gov/cnpp/Pubs/Brochures/

MyPyramid.gov

What foods are in the grain group? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/grains.html

How many grain foods are needed daily? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/grains_amount.aspx

What counts as an ounce-equivalent of grains? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/grains_counts.html

Tips to help you eat whole grains. 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/grains_tips.html


Dietary Guideline: Food Groups to Encourage
Key Recommendation: Milk and Equivalent Milk Products

Program Planning Considerations for OAA Nutrition Programs

Tips for Meal Planning

In general
Breakfast
Lunch/Dinner
Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005.
Appendix B-4. Non-Dairy Food Sources of Calcium. 2005: 59. Available at:
www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/appendixB.htm#appB4

Appendix B-5. Food Sources of Calcium. 2005: 60. Available at:
www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/appendixB.htm#appB5

USDA
MyPyramid.gov

What foods are included in the milk, yogurt, and cheese (milk) group? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/milk.html

How much food from the milk group is needed daily? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/milk_amount.aspx

What counts as 1 cup in the milk group? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/milk_counts.html

Tips to for making wise choices. 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/milk_tips.html


Dietary Guideline: Fats
Key Recommendations: Fats

Program Planning Considerations for OAA Nutrition Programs

Tips for Meal Planning

Resources

Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005.
Table 8. Maximum Daily Amounts of Saturated Fat to Keep Saturated Fat Below 10 Percent of Total Calorie Intake. 2005: 31. Available at:
www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/chapter6.htm#table8

Table 9. Differences in Saturated Fat and Calorie Content of Commonly Consumed Foods. 2005: 32. Available at:
www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/chapter6.htm#table9

Table 10. Contribution of Various Foods to Saturated Fat Intake in the American Diet. 2005: 33. Available at:
www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/chapter6.htm#table10

Table 11. Contribution of Various Foods to Trans Fat Intake in the American Diet. 2005: 34. Available at:
www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/chapter6.htm#table11

Table 12. Relationship Between LDL Blood Cholesterol Goal and the Level of Coronary Heart Disease Risk. 2005: 34. Available at:
www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/chapter6.htm#table12

USDA
MyPyramid.gov

What are oils? 2005. Available at: www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/oils.html

How are oils different from solid fats? 2005. Available at: www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/oils_how.html

How do I count the oils I eat? 2005. Available at: www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/oils_count.html

What are solid fats? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/discretionary_calories_fats.html

Tips to help you make wise choices from the meat and beans group. 2005. Available at: www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/meat_tips.html

American Heart Association
Recipes for low-fat and low cholesterol meals. Available at:
www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=515

Know your fats. 2005. Available at:
www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=532

Make Healthy Food Choices. 2005. Available at:
www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=537

Eating Plan: Fats and Oils. 2005. Available at:
www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=1003

Eating Plan Tips. 2005. Available at:
www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=1085

National Heart, Blood and Lung Institute
Be Heart Smart! Eat foods lower in saturated fat and cholesterol. 1997. Available at:
www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/other/chdblack/smart1.htm

Fat-Free Versus Regular Calorie Comparison. Available at:
www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/lose_wt/fat_free.htm

Low-Calorie, Lower-Fat Alternative Foods. Available at:
www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/lose_wt/lcal_fat.htm

Action Guide for Healthy Eating
Action List for Fat. 1999. Available at:
www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/food/guideeat/Alistpg.html

U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Questions and Answers about Trans Fat Nutrition Labeling. 2004. Available at:
www.cfsan.fda. dms/qatrans2.html

Revealing Trans Fat. 2004. Available at:
www.fda.gov/fdac/features/2003/503_fats.html


Dietary Guideline: Carbohydrates
Key Recommendations: Carbohydrates

Program Planning Considerations

Tips for Meal Planning

Resources

Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005
Appendix B-8. Food Sources of Dietary Fiber. Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office; 2005: 63-64. Available at:
www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/appendixB.htm#AppB8

Table 13. Major Sources of Added Sugars (Caloric Sweeteners) in the American Diet; 2005: 38. Available at:
www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/chapter7.htm#table13

Table 14. Names for Added Sugars that Appear on Food Labels; 2005: 38. Available at:
www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/chapter7.htm#table14

USDA
MyPyramid.gov

Tips and resources on eating more grains, vegetable, and fruits. 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/tips_resources/index.html

What does MyPyramid say about mixed dishes? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/tips_resources/mixed_food_information.html

What counts as a cup of vegetables? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/vegetables_counts.html

What counts as a cup of fruit? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/fruits_counts.html

What counts as an ounce equivalent of grains? Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/grains_counts.html

What are "added sugars"? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/discretionary_calories_sugars.html

Why is it important to eat grains, especially whole grains? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/grains_why.html

Why is it important to eat vegetables? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/vegetables_why.html

Why is it important to eat fruits? 2005. Available at:
www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/fruits_why.html

Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion
Fabulous Fruits, Versatile Vegetables. 2003. Available at:
www.usda.gov/cnpp/Pubs/Brochures/FabFruits-screen.pdf

Get on the Grain Train. 2002. Available at:
www.usda.gov/cnpp/Pubs/Brochures/GrainTrainPamphlet.pdf


Dietary Guideline: Sodium and Potassium
Key Recommendations: Sodium and Potassium

Program Planning Considerations for OAA Nutrition Programs

Tips for Meal Planning

Resources

National Heart, Blood and Lung Institute
The DASH Eating Plan. 2003. Available at:
www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/hbp/dash/

Your Guide to Lowering High Blood Pressure: Reduce Salt and Sodium in your Diet. Available at:
www.nhlbi.nih.gov/hbp/prevent/sodium/sodium.htm

Your Guide to Lowering High Blood Pressure: Healthy Eating. Available at:
www.nhlbi.nih.gov/hbp/prevent/h_eating/h_eating.htm

American Heart Association
Eat foods lower in sodium. 2005. Available at:
www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=552

Cutting down on salt. 2005. Available at:
www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=336

Shake your salt habit. 2005. Available at:
www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=2106

Make Healthy Food Choices. 2005. Available at:
www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=570

Use Seasonings instead of Table Salt. 2005. Available at:
www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=585

Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005
Appendix B-1. Food Sources of Potassium. 2005: 56. Available at:
www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/appendixB.htm#AppB1

Table 15 Range of Sodium Content for Selected Foods. 2005: 42. Available at:
www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/chapter8.htm#table15


Dietary Guideline: Food Safety
Key Recommendations: Food Safety

Program Planning Considerations for OAA Nutrition Programs

Tips for Meal Planning

Resources

Gateway to Government Food Safety Information
www.foodsafety.gov/

Partnership for Food Safety Education
Fight Bac! 2004. Available at: www.fightbac.org

Food Safety and Inspection Service
Seniors Need Wisdom on Food Safety. 2006. Available at:
www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets/Seniors_Need_Wisdom_on_Food_Safety/index.asp

Cooking for Groups: A Volunteer's Guide to Food Safety. 2006. Available at:
www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets/Cooking_for_Groups_index/index.asp

USDA/FDA
To Your Health! Food Safety for Seniors. 2000. Available at:
www.foodsafety.gov/~fsg/sr2.html

The Safe Food Chart: FRUITS, VEGETABLES, and JUICES. 2001. Available at:
www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/fttfruit.html

Can Your Kitchen Pass the Food Safety Test? 2002. Available at:
www.fda.gov/fdac/features/895_kitchen.html

The Big Thaw - Safe Defrosting Methods for Consumers. 2003. Available at:
www.fsis.usda.gov/fact_sheets/Big_Thaw/index.asp
 
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